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Journey to Harar - 2007
PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2007 11:43 pm Reply with quote
malasay
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Insha'Allah coming soon to a website near you

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Re: Journey to Harar - 2007
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2007 9:35 am Reply with quote
malasay
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Alhamduli'llah I made it to Ethiopia safe and sound on June 10th, 2007. The journey wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. I slept thru much of the way, and had a pleasant conversation with the person who was sitting next to me, as well with those who were sitting infront of me and behind me.

However, I was disappointed when it was time to pick my luggages. Out of 5 luggages that I brought with me, only one made it. I have been going to the airport for the last 3 days to no avail. About two years ago I lost 1 of my luggage, and it has never been recovered. I hope I will have a better luck this time, but I ain't holding my breath.

What's up with Ethiopian Airlines?

In any case, insha'Allah I am planning to head to Harar tomorrow.

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Re: Journey to Harar - 2007
PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2007 9:24 am Reply with quote
Ilalami
Joined: 10 Mar 2006
Posts: 14




malasay wrote:
Alhamduli'llah I made it to Ethiopia safe and sound on June 10th, 2007. The journey wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. I slept thru much of the way, and had a pleasant conversation with the person who was sitting next to me, as well with those who were sitting infront of me and behind me.

However, I was disappointed when it was time to pick my luggages. Out of 5 luggages that I brought with me, only one made it. I have been going to the airport for the last 3 days to no avail. About two years ago I lost 1 of my luggage, and it has never been recovered. I hope I will have a better luck this time, but I ain't holding my breath.

What's up with Ethiopian Airlines?

In any case, insha'Allah I am planning to head to Harar tomorrow.



Happy safe arrival and good to hear from you.

As for luggage handling, I think the Ethiopian Airline should seriously look into improving and protect its reputation. I was about in the same boat end of 1995; however I was noisy enough to retrieve mine during my trip in end of December 1995.

My luggage arrived safe from Cairo to Addis, and I left it at the Airport for the next day trip to Dire Dawa. The next morning they started loading the luggage on to the plane while verifying each owner. Some how my two luggage didnít show and the loader said these are the last once.

I said Nop, youíve more, because mine is missing. While arguing a gentleman showed up, I guess he is the manager and I told him point blank ď Iím not leaving this field until I get my luggage with me and I donít see why it disappeared under 24hrs period, this is not good for the Airline ReputationĒ. Well, the manager was nice and respectful at the time. He just told the driver of the cart, GO back and find this Manís luggage now, he doesnít seem leaving without getting itĒ. Minutes later here they come only two of mine ridding on the cart. I was the last one to board.

I would recommend speaking to the real people. The people in charge of the administration. Make sure your complained is heard at the upper management level. This may help.

Good luck

Cheers,
Ilalami
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2007 1:00 am Reply with quote
malasay
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Wanting to be in Harar, but stuck in Addis pretty much sums up my situation at the moment. Two of my luggage has made it through, two more are left. The computer that I use for editing videos is still among missing. I took brother Ilami's advise and spoke with a higher official at Ethiopian Airlines. They were much more sympathetic and helpful. The person I spoke with sent messages to the Washington office trying to trace the luggage. However, when they traced the luggage it showed that United Airlines never delivered the items to Ethiopian, but rather they sent it to London. I was skeptical about that explanation, until I saw the two luggage that arrived wrapped with British Airways tapes. It looks like the security officials in London ripped thru the luggage and wrapped it with plastic bags, and then wrapped it with tapes.

In any case, the positive thing that came out of the delay to my trip to Harar was witnessing how well the Addis branch of the Harar Millennium organizing committee was prepared to welcome the Hararis in the diaspora, as well as their mobilization efforts to get Hararis locally to participate in the celebration of Harar's Millennium. The reception they gave to Hararis that arrived from Canada via KLM on June 16th is testimonial to their well preparedness. One hundred and eighty roses were purchased to be given to each Harari that arrived on that day. Rose petals and sweet candies were toasted over the heads of the new arrivals (fola), as is the custom of Hararis when loved ones come from a long journey.

The atmosphere was joyous and festive. Hugs, kisses, smiles, and some tears were exchanged among relatives and friends. Several Hararis from Addis came to the airport to give ride or render any assistance that might be needed. Harar Travel and Tour also dispatched six of their mini-vans to give ride to the new comers.

Thank you Harar Travel and Tour for your courteous and professional services!

Just witnessing the welcoming ceremony in Addis makes one wonder what is awaiting in Harar!

Echoing Shaikh Abadir, let it be declared - "Hazuki ya Harar!!!"

The Federal State allowed the welcoming committees to enter all the way past the customs agents, and helped facilitate the process of passing through the customs. Extra security procedures were also taken by searching all vehicles entering the airport. My appreciations go to the federal government officials who made the colorful welcoming ceremony a possibility.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2007 7:26 am Reply with quote
malasay
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Alhamduli'llah, finally I made it to Harar! Harar looks colorful, vibrant and beautiful. The people are preparing to welcome their compatriots in the diaspora by painting their houses white. The monument that is being built for the Chelenqo martyrs is progressing well, and will be ready on time for the millennium celebration.

May the Lord protect Harar and her people.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2007 3:23 am Reply with quote
malasay
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After staying for three or four days in Harar, I had to head back to Addis to take care of some unfinished business. Insha'Allah will be heading to Harar tomorrow.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2007 9:23 am Reply with quote
malasay
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Harar's Millennium - What a breath taking event!

I am not able to report on the festivities as much as i hoped ... but insha'Allah the report will trickle down to those of you who couldn't attend.

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Harar 2007
PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2007 6:52 pm Reply with quote
mohyuya
Joined: 03 Feb 2006
Posts: 5




July 9, 2007

Kef Mohammed Hassen,

Is there a way to see the activities that are taking place in Harar. Something like pictures summary report of your perception of how the event is unfolding and the native peopleís reaction about the whole program and the visitorís perception.


If possible I would be really happy if you post some pictures on Malasay website. Pictures of the inauguration day activity; reception at chelenqo; reception in Harar;
Some interview of the native Hararians and visitors.


Thanks,
Mohammed
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2007 11:42 am Reply with quote
gishta
Joined: 23 Nov 2004
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agree. Can't wait to see pictures.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2007 7:08 pm Reply with quote
gishta
Joined: 23 Nov 2004
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Malasay, Ok ok. No picture. Can you at least describe the events. Does someone has to invest on internet cafe in Harar? If you're just busy, You need to tell all the people you're barching with, you gotta connect with your pps around the World.

Oh, saw some clip from ETV via sattelite. Event at faras megala, by the new monument. Dancing and singing, and making us drool.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2007 3:33 am Reply with quote
malasay
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My apologies to all of you for the serious delay in posting updates on the event. However, like they say "better late than never" ... so here we go. I'll start with my recent trip to Siltie Zone and retrace my steps backwards. Enjoy.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2007 3:41 am Reply with quote
malasay
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Journey to Siltie Zone


Since I heard about the unique relationship that exists between the Harari and Siltie people few years back, I have always wanted to know more about this special relationship amongst our two people. The few articles that I have read over the internet or the agreements that were signed between the Harari Regional State and Siltie Zone served as more catalysts to study this issue further. However, what actually motivated and convinced me of the need to travel to Siltie zone during the Shewal Eid celebration were the persistent questions that were being raised by some segments of both the Harari and Siltie people about the legitimacy of the claim that we are one people. One such question was raised by an individual during a general meeting that was being held by the Harari National League (HNL) in Addis Ababa on 20th of Ramadan. It was then that I made my mind to travel to Siltie Zone and to study the facts on the ground myself.

I knew Siltie Zone was in Southern People's National Regional State, but I had no clue where it was located within that State or how to get there. So I called a Siltie neighbor and friend of mine in Addis by the name of Hajj Awal Aman and I told him of my plan to travel to Siltie Zone during the Shawal Eid holidays. We originally intended to travel together, but due to conflict of schedules he couldn't make the journey. However, he promised to arrange whatever is needed for the journey, including contacting Siltie Zone officials to show us historic places during our stay there.

I reckoned it would be more interesting and education to travel with friends, rather than going solo. Thus, I recruited two friends of mine to accompany me in this journey. One was Teshome Berhane, and the other was Mubarak Mohammed. Teshome is a Muslim with ancestral roots in both Tigray and Walo. Both side of his family claim descent from Aw Abadir. He is writing an extensive book about Imam Ahmed, and in the process is traveling all across Ethiopia in the footsteps of the Imam. He plans to travel to Somaliland soon to gather more material for his book. I was introduced to Teshome by Ahmed Zakaria so we can collaborate on the "Imam Ahmed" documentary I am working on. It didn't take too long to convince Teshome to agree to join me in this journey.



Mubarak is a friend of mine and belongs to the Somali Shaikhash clan. In Ethiopia the Shaikhash used to live mostly in the Ogaden region, but are currently displaced due to the ongoing internal conflicts. May Allah make our nation a peaceful place where all can live in peace and tranquility. The Shaikhash also claim descent from Aw Abadir. In fact they have changed the name of their clan to Faqi Omar, and they no longer use Shaikhash to refer to their clan. So here we were three descendants of Aw Abadir planning to embark on a journey to investigate our connection with the Siltie people, who are also descendants of Aw Abadir. This journey was promising to be a reunion of sort amongst the descendants of Aw Abadir.

Shawal Eid was on Friday October 19th. Therefore, we decided to head to Worabe, the capital of Siltie Zone on Thursday October 18th to observe how this holiday was celebrated in Siltie community. We headed out with a car that was rented for us by Hajj Awal. However, due to network failure we could not get a hold of the Siltie Zone officials to let them know that we were coming to Worabe on that specific date. We decided to take a chance and head there anyway since Teshome and Mubarak have already requested vacation time from their respective work places. We drove south for about 4 hours and we arrived in Worabe. Worabe is very close to Boutajira, for those who might be familiar with that town. Worabe is a new city that was built within the last 4 years. What our Siltie brethrens are doing in Worabe is nothing short of a miracle. It seems like every economically capable Siltie individual is investing in that city. Everything from masjids, schools, banks, restaurants, and wide roads came into being, where there was nothing before. I believe Hararis should look at the example of Worabe very closely. Hararis tend to expect everything from our government officials instead of being responsible and bringing change as a community. The Shaikh Abubaker School Waqf project in Harar that has stopped being constructed due to lack of funding should serve as a sharp contrast with what is going on in Siltie Zone in regards to the participation of the community in the development of their region.

Getting back to Siltie zone - the driver of the rental car dropped us at a hotel, Riyad Hotel, around 5:00 pm and headed back to Addis. Mean while the mobile network in Worabe was still down, and we had no means of communicating with Siltie Zone officials. We were getting a bit concerned about how we were going to move around in Siltie zone to observe the Shawal Eid celebration, as well as to investigate the connection between the Harari and Siltie people without a guide and vehicle. We decided to check-in into the hotel first. It wasn't like we had plenty of choices anyway. We managed to get a comfortable and nice room with hot shower for 30 birr each. Then we asked the hotel attendant if he knew how we could get a hold of H.E. Mr. Sani Radi, the chief administrator of Siltie Zone. To our pleasant surprise his office was right behind our hotel. We headed there immediately and arrived at Mr. Sani's office around 5:30 pm. Would he be there at that late hour in the eve of a major holiday in Siltie Zone?

Stay tuned until the next entry to find out what really happened.


Last edited by malasay on Thu Feb 07, 2008 5:32 am; edited 2 times in total

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2007 4:15 am Reply with quote
malasay
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When we got to Mr. Sani's office to our delight he was still in his office. I was happy to see 3 or 4 posters of Harar hanging on his wall, including a copy of the certificate awarded by UNESCO registering Harar in the World Heritage list. Seeing those posters of my city in this far away place made me feel at home. I knew then that we were among our people. Mr. Sani was a down to earth, gentle and intelligent person. He listened to us describing the reason why we came to Siltie Zone attentively. We told him we came to document how Shawal Eid was celebrated in Siltie Zone, as well as to explore the connection between the Harari and Siltie people, and as such that we wanted to visit historic sites that might shed light on this matter. He told us that he had no clue that we were coming to Siltie Zone. I had also talked to the President of the Harari Regional State, H.E. Muard Abdulhadi before we embarked on this journey. President Murad told me that he would contact Mr. Sani, and that the Harari Regional State would partially sponsor the documentary. Apparently he also could not get a hold of Mr. Sani due to the network problem, and neither could Hajj Awal.

Nonetheless, Mr. Sani welcomed us graciously and with open arms. Concerning the reasons we traveled to Siltie Zone, he told us that there were no unique venues where Shawal Eid is celebrated in their region in masses like it is done in Harar. He explained to us that Shawal Eid amongst the Siltie people is a private family affair, where families gather together and receive blessings/duas from their parents. He told us that he can arrange for us to visit couple of households to see how a typical family celebrates Shawal Eid. As to the historic sites, he gave us names of several sites that he will arrange for us to visit. He told us that he will send a vehicle for us early in the morning the next day to give us a tour of Siltie Zone. With that brief and warm exchange we parted ways. We headed to our hotel and he went to his home.

Once we got to the hotel we ate our dinner at the restaurant, watched the Al Jazeera channel to catch up with the world news, discussed about our perception of Siltie Zone, as well as about our planned tour the next day. In the process Teshome, Mubarak, and I were also getting to know each other better. While we were chatting at the dinner table, Mr. Sani and group of officials came to meet with us. We greeted and introduced one another. They said "arhibu" and we all sat down, and discussed further in detail about our planned tour during our stay in Siltie Zone. I understood "arhibu" to mean similar to the arabic word "itfadalu." However, with all that was going on, I forgot to ask the meaning of the word. However, I liked how the word was used and sounded.

After arranging the schedule they bid as farewell and went to their respective homes. We heard the azan shortly thereafter, and we headed to the nearest masjid. The masjid was huge, and with a very large courtyard. Like the rest of Werabai it was constructed within the last four years. We made our abolition and performed our maghrib and isha prayers, and then headed back to the hotel taking the long route. By the time we got to the hotel we were all tired from the journey and the walk, and we decided to call it a night and hit the sack.

What happened the next day? Insha'Allah the story will continue tomorrow.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2007 3:02 am Reply with quote
malasay
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Ah, tomorrow. I was starting to wonder when it would arrive, because tomorrow always brings another tomorrow.

Back to the journey ...

We woke up early in the morning on Friday – the day of Shawl Eid. Teshome went to the masjid by himself in the morning for the dawn prayers, while Mubarak and I opted to pray in our respective hotel rooms.

Around 7:30 am the three of us went out looking for breakfast, but they were all closed due to the Shawl Eid festival. However, we finally managed to find a hotel that served breakfast. We ordered fatira with eggs, which took quite sometimes to make. We were starting to get concerned that our hosts will come before we ate our breakfast. Eventually the fatira made it to our table. It was delicious and definitely worth the wait.

Br. Mohammed Yusuf, one of the people who came to meet us with Mr. Sani the previous night at our hotel, arrived right after we finished our breakfast. He told us that we were going to visit a family in Worabe to see how a typical family celebrates Shawl Eid. We got into the vehicle with camera on hand and headed south. After few minutes of driving we stopped by a house, where a child of 9 or 10 was waiting for us anxiously. We got out of the vehicle, and he led us into the house.

All the family members got up and welcomed us warmly. We exchanged salaams and sat down. The house was a large hut house. The parents were sitting a bit toward the center of the house. The men were seated to the right of the parents while facing them, and the women were seated on the left side of the parents.

Whenever a family member came in from outside, he or she would kiss the parents affectionately and present a gift to them. A gift was brought to the parents even on behalf of small children, and the parents made dua to their children and grandchildren. We learned that the dua of the parents to their children was the centerpiece of the Shawl Eid celebration in Siltie Zone. In this family we visited, whenever the parents made dua some of the family members stood up, bent themselves while raising both their hands in supplication format and saying ameen.

I said to myself, this is a community that really grasped the worth of a parent’s prayer. Insha’Allah these people are destined to greatness in our nation.

The family wanted us to eat with them the special meal that was prepared for Shawal Eid, but but that fatira!! We kindly declined and told them we had just eaten our breakfast. Shortly thereafter we bid each other farewell, and headed back north.

Mr. Mohammed Yusuf told us that Mr. Sani would also join us in our next trip. What a pleasant surprise! We picked Mr. Sani up and headed towards Mitto, which was about 32 km east of Worabe. Mitto is renowned for its farm. Everywhere we looked there was luscious greenery and farms. In the way to Mitto we learned that Mr. Mohammed Yusuf was the head of Dalocha Werada, which included Mitto. Talk about gracious hosts!

We saw many young families with their children in the street dressed up and heading towards their parents house on foot or horses to celebrate Shawal Eid. One such couple flagged our vehicle, and Mr. Sani was kind enough to give them a ride. This gave us more opportunity to ask questions about this unique festivity that we were witnessing in Siltie Zone. This couple told us that they were heading to the residence of the husband’s parents first, and then to that of wife’s.


Mohammed Yusuf, Sani Radi, & Mohammed

After some distance, the couple disembarked and we bid them farewell and continued with our journey to Mitto. In the way we saw a majestic looking lady riding a horse. I wanted to ask the driver to stop the car so I could to videotape the lady on the horse. However, I thought I would be able to see such things and I let it go. That proved to be a mistake. Henceforth, I saw no lady on a horseback during our stay in Siltie Zone. Shucks!

We finally arrived in Mitto. We went to the residence of Azmach Jabir Imam Hussein. There was a large group of people there engaged in doing zikr and praising the Prophet (SAW). When we came they all greeted us with warmth and open arms. The residence was quiet a large hut. Everybody there was a close relative of Azmach Jabir and their extended families. Azmach Jabir claimed descent from Aw Abadir.

They performed the zikr in both Amharic and Siltie languages, accompanied with drumbeats that sounded a lot familiar to that of Harar. The atmosphere of the Shawal Eid celebration in this compound was much closer to that of Harar. After observing and recording the event in Mitto for a while, we were invited to have lunch with a family near by.

The main dish was a delicious kitfo served with various types of cottage cheese. We ate our lunch, and it was coffee time. I am not a coffee person, but I do drink coffee on occasions. I find the taste of coffee to be bitter, and can only handle it with lots of sugar and cream. Even if there is no cream, it gotta have lots of sugar! The coffee that was served to us was unique. It had salt and butter in it. I wanted to be a gracious guest and tried to drink the coffee. I took one sip and had difficulty taking a second one. I excused myself and told them I was not familiar with drinking coffee with salt and butter. They told me not to worry, and offered me honey with water. Sugar sugar sugar!! Yes! (Disclaimer: this is not an advertisement for sugar).


Coffee with Salt & Butter

After we had conversation with our generous hosts for a while, it was time to head back to Worabe. We bid the family that treated us so kindly farewell, and headed back to the hotel. Mr. Sani and Mr. Mohammed Yusuf told us that Mr. Mohammed Nur would come for us later in the afternoon to show us some of the historic places that we wanted to see. Mr. Mohammed Nur is an advisor to Mr. Sani. With that we bid each other farewell and the 3 of us headed to our respective hotel rooms to get some rest and to be refreshed for the afternoon adventure.

Insha’Allah will be continued soon.


Last edited by malasay on Thu Feb 07, 2008 6:52 am; edited 2 times in total

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 1:43 am Reply with quote
malasay
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Mr. Mohammed Nur arrived later in the afternoon and we headed south and then eastward for about 50 km towards Oumnan, in Azernet Berbere Woreda. Our final destination was the ancient mosque and shrine of Haji Aliye, who is considered to be the father of the Siltie people. The road was rugged and ascended upward a winding mountain, which made it seem as if we traveled for much more than 100 km.

Eventually we arrived at the administrative office of Azernet Berbere Woreda. Mr. Behredin Mussa, who is an official of the Woreda, accompanied us in our remaining journey towards Oumnan along with several of his companions. The scenery as we were approaching Oumnan was truly majestic and breath taking. It had open fields with green grasses and tall trees that were spread spaciously. A majestic mountain stands towering over us in a distance. We were told Oumnan was located right at the foot of the mountain.

We drove for a while, and all of a sudden our vehicle stopped. No, we did not reach our final destination. There was muddy water that lay on our path. We went out to inspect whether our vehicle would be able to pass through it or not. We determined that it would be impossible for the vehicle to pass through the mud without getting stuck. So we decided to complete the rest of our journey by foot.

About ten of us were heading towards Oumnan by foot, as more and more people started to join us along the way out of curiosity. At the end, perhaps there was 20 of us or more.

Who was Hajj Aliye?

Hajj Aliye was one of Imam Ahmed’s generals who were sent to this region along with 600 soldiers to pacify it. Usually the Imam’s armies settled in mountainous areas to be able to better defend their positions. As we approached nearer and nearer to the mountain, I couldn’t help but feel as if we were in the army of the Imam. Armed with a video camera and pens, instead of swords and shields, we passed through a valley that had beautiful streams all around it. They say a pen is mightier than a sword, Insha’Allah we shall see if that should hold true in this case. Teshome will be publishing his book about Imam Ahmed pretty soon.

I would like to say few words about the special video camera I was carrying with me. It was a cannon XL2. It is a real beauty. However, its true beauty does not emanate from its brand, but rather from the fact that it was purchased through the generous donation of the Harari and Siltie communities in Washington, as well as members of HCO in Toronto, ONT. I would like to take this opportunity to thank all those who donated towards the purchase of the video camera, and I want you to know it is being put to a good use.

Now back to the story …

As we were crossing through the valley, we had to cross over streams at several locations. At couple of the locations, it was barely two logs of trees that lay over the stream. I had my dress shoes on, since I didn’t think we were going to walk on foot. It was a mistake. Now I had to walk across tree logs to reach the shrine of Hajj Aliye. I gave the video camera to a seasoned tree crosser, as I walked tittering over the log.

Teshome was walking briskly and was ahead of us quiet a distance. Mubarak was not too far ahead of my group. Our guides kept telling us we were getting close, whenever we asked how far we had to walk. But we kept on walking and walking and walking.

Finally we reached our destination. We were standing in Oumnan. It was here that the heroic malasays, Hajj Aliye and his companions, camped and made their livings. The shrine of Hajj Aliye was a simple place, surrounded with the beauty and majesty of the mountain that was embracing it.

An elder person with knowledge about the history of Hajj Aliye and his companions was brought for us to interview on location. He informed us that Hajj Aliye originated from Harar, and that he had the following children:

1. Dilapa 2. Abecho 3. Aleqero 4. semeredin 5. Gensilti 6. Oyotte and others

It was starting to get dark as we were interviewing the man. We wrapped our interview and started heading towards our vehicle in total darkness. The only light we were relying on was that of the moon and our mobile phones. And yes, we had to cross over the streams with couple of logs placed over them again – this time in darkness.

After walking for quiet a while, we made it to the vehicle. However, our hosts informed us that there was an elderly person in the area whom we should consider interviewing. He was deemed to be knowledgeable in history. We were more than happy to oblige. After driving for few minutes we arrived at his place of residence. His name was Imam Aliye. He was between the ages of 80 to 90.

The hut was dim with couple of lanterns fighting against the darkness. The family welcomed as graciously as we have experienced all over Siltie Zone. During our entire journey we have not encountered a single person who was not kind to us. Imam Aliye asked his family to serve us tea and bread. We declined so as not to burden them, but he insisted and we eventually accepted the family’s offer.

Imam Aliye is the descendant of Hajj Aliye, who in turn is the descendant of Aw Abadir. I learned something very valuable from br. Teshome during this trip. He would ask the people that he interviewed, up to how many generations they could count? and he would ask them to actually count. He did the same with Imam Aliye. The ancestors of Imam Aliye are as follows:

Imam Aliye
Ibn Imam Hamid
Ibn Ibrahim
Ibn Imam Umer
Ibn Bushra
Ibn Imam Mohammed
Ibn Imam Khedir
Ibn Azmach Aleqero
Ibn Hajj Aliye

After a while, we completed out interview with Imam Aliye, and started to head back towards Worabe. However, not so fast said Mr. Behredin Mussa, the Azernet Berbere Woreda official, and his companions. You cannot leave without having dinner with us, they insisted. After our original resistance, we once again obliged so as to not disappoint our hosts.

After having a delicious candle light dinner at a restaurant, this time we really started to head back towards Worabe. Mubarak and Teshome fell asleep in the way back, while Mohammed Nur, the driver, and I listened to the radio as we were inching closer and closer to Worabe. Ultimately we reached our hotel and called it a night.

Now I need to call it a night, too. It is 1:00 am. Good night folks! Two more days of adventure are still left in Siltie Zone, so stay tuned.


Last edited by malasay on Thu Feb 07, 2008 6:19 am; edited 1 time in total

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Journey to Harar - 2007
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